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Steelhead Trout Amandine

Steelhead Trout Amandine

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Pound haricot verts
  • 4 trout fillets
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • Canola oil
  • Flour, for dusting
  • 4 Ounces butter
  • 1 medium shallot, minced
  • 2 lemons, juiced
  • 1/4 Cup sliced almonds, toasted

Directions

Preheat oven to 200 degrees F.

Trim the stem end from the haricot verts and cut in half. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Cook the beans until just tender and refresh under cold water. Set aside in a colander to drain.

Make sure the trout fillets are cleaned well. Pat dry and season with salt and pepper.

Place a large skillet over medium-high heat and preheat the canola oil. Lightly dust the trout with flour and pan fry, one at a time in until golden on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.

As the trout finish cooking, place them on a platter in the oven to stay warm. When the last fish is cooked, dump the excess fat from the pan. Reduce the heat to medium, add the butter, and sauté the shallots for 30 seconds. Add the haricots verts and warm through. Season with salt and pepper and add the lemon juice. Spoon the haricot verts and sauce over the platter of trout and garnish with toasted almonds.

Nutritional Facts

Servings4

Calories Per Serving419

Folate equivalent (total)40µg10%

Riboflavin (B2)0.2mg12.7%


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Deceptively easy, elegant trout amandine really does come together in less than 30 minutes

Trout amandine is a thing I crave. If I see it on a restaurant menu, I order it. When I’m tired and feel like I need a deliciously comforting meal (and who doesn’t these days?), I make it. It’s the kind of easy elegance that I wish I could replicate in every weeknight meal, but few dishes come together so quickly, with so few ingredients and such a big reward at the end.

This is hands-down my favorite way to eat fresh trout fillets. Pat them dry, dust them with flour, pan-fry them in fat until golden. Then, remove the fillets and make a meunière sauce, which sounds fancy, but is really nothing more than browned butter with lemon and a sprinkle of fresh parsley. Finally, I like to add sliced or slivered almonds to the sauce to turn this into amandine.

Pour the sauce over the fillets and serve them with steamed asparagus or green beans, a hunk of crispy bread and a glass of dry white wine, such as sauvignon blanc. Heaven.

Is the dish best with speckled sea trout just pulled from salty water? I think so, but I’ve made it with fresh drum and flounder as well as more readily available and less expensive frozen fillets, such as catfish or rainbow trout.

In his cookbook, “The Deep End of Flavor: Recipes and Stories from New Orleans’ Premier Seafood Chef” (Gibbs Smith, 2019), Tenney Flynn says that “in French cuisine, sole is the fish that made this dish famous.”

“Once you get the hang of it you can go in a thousand directions using whatever fish looks best at your market,” said Flynn, who recently retired but remains active in supporting sustainable seafood and is a co-owner of GW Fins restaurant, a well-respected seafood restaurant in the French Quarter.

Scale and get a printer-friendly version of the recipe here.

The cooking technique, one of dozens he carefully explains in his cookbook, is simple. Perhaps the most difficult part is flipping the fish. Flynn describes how to do it in the recipe below, but I’ve cheated sometimes and cut the pieces of fish in half, so they fit more easily onto a thin spatula. The result is not as pretty as those long, slender fillets, but it is a perfectly fine way to build confidence.

Flynn also explains that the pan-frying and meunière sauce techniques are fundamental — delicious and classic. They offer a canvas for so many variations. He recommends preparing the fish and sauce and then thinking creatively about additions. If I’m feeling extravagant, I might add a half cup of lump crabmeat with those generous handfuls of almonds.


Watch the video: Trout Amandine - Stuffed and Grilled to Perfection - PoorMansGourmet (November 2021).